Today is World Habitat Day

Posted on 6 October 2008. Filed under: Environment |

The United Nations has designated the first Monday in October each year as World Habitat Day. The idea is to reflect on the state of our towns and cities and the basic right to adequate shelter for all. It is also intended to remind the world of its collective responsibility for the future of the human habitat.

From Africa through Asia to Europe and the Americas, governments, civic bodies as well as NGOs are laying out elaborate plans to mark this year’s event whose theme is ‘Harmoniuos Cities’ to be celebrated on October 6.Global observance of the occasion this year will be led from the Angolan capital, Luanda. The celebrations in Angola will show the world, how the country, after years of conflict, is progressing in the establishment of harmonious cities through urban development, poverty alleviation, improved land and housing rights, and providing access to basic urban services.

World Habitat Day this year comes on the eve of the fourth session of the World Urban Forum in Nanjing, China 3-6 November. The Forum, the world’s premier conference on managing our growing towns and cities, will also be the occasion of the launch of UN-HABITAT’s flagship biennial publication, the State of the World’s Cities.

The United Nations chose the theme of Harmonious Cities for the Forum and World Habitat Day to raise awareness about the problems of rapid urbanization, its impact on the environment, the growth of slums, and the urbanisation of poverty as more and more people teem into towns and cities looking for a better life.

Last week, a high-level delegation led by Angola’s Deputy Minister of Urban Affairs and the Environment visited UN-HABITAT headquarters in Nairobi to finalise plans for World Habitat Day.

Back home in Kenya, we publish some images showing the status of our rivers in Nairobi.

Nairobi River Basin - Major Pollutants

Nairobi River Basin - Major Pollutants

A heavily-polluted Ngong River courses through Nairobis Eastlands region from its industrial zone on October 1, 2008. The urbanisation of African countries puts increasingly scarce water resources under great pressure from both industrial and domestic use, fast overwhelming ageing water management techniques and infrastructure. Kenya, like many developing economies, faces chronic water shortage as a result of which there is an increase of water-borne diseases and poisoning among urban dwellers who have been pushed to depend on alternative water sources that are unhealthy.

A heavily-polluted Ngong River courses through Nairobi's Eastlands region from its industrial zone on October 1, 2008. The urbanisation of African countries puts increasingly scarce water resources under great pressure from both industrial and domestic use, fast overwhelming ageing water management techniques and infrastructure. Kenya, like many developing economies, faces chronic water shortage as a result of which there is an increase of water-borne diseases and poisoning among urban dwellers who have been pushed to depend on alternative water sources that are unhealthy.

A heavily-polluted Ngong River courses through Nairobis Eastlands region from its industrial zone on October 1, 2008. The urbanisation of African countries puts increasingly scarce water resources under great pressure from both industrial and domestic use, fast overwhelming ageing water management techniques and infrastructure. Kenya, like many developing economies, faces chronic water shortage as a result of which there is an increase of water-borne diseases and poisoning among urban dwellers who have been pushed to depend on alternative water sources that are unhealthy.

A heavily-polluted Ngong River courses through Nairobi's Eastlands region from its industrial zone on October 1, 2008. The urbanisation of African countries puts increasingly scarce water resources under great pressure from both industrial and domestic use, fast overwhelming ageing water management techniques and infrastructure. Kenya, like many developing economies, faces chronic water shortage as a result of which there is an increase of water-borne diseases and poisoning among urban dwellers who have been pushed to depend on alternative water sources that are unhealthy.

A heavily-polluted Ngong River courses through Nairobis Eastlands region from its industrial zone on October 1, 2008. The urbanisation of African countries puts increasingly scarce water resources under great pressure from both industrial and domestic use, fast overwhelming ageing water management techniques and infrastructure. Kenya, like many developing economies, faces chronic water shortage as a result of which there is an increase of water-borne diseases and poisoning among urban dwellers who have been pushed to depend on alternative water sources that are unhealthy.

A heavily-polluted Ngong River courses through Nairobi's Eastlands region from its industrial zone on October 1, 2008. The urbanisation of African countries puts increasingly scarce water resources under great pressure from both industrial and domestic use, fast overwhelming ageing water management techniques and infrastructure. Kenya, like many developing economies, faces chronic water shortage as a result of which there is an increase of water-borne diseases and poisoning among urban dwellers who have been pushed to depend on alternative water sources that are unhealthy.

A heavily-polluted Ngong River courses through Nairobis Eastlands region from its industrial zone on October 1, 2008. The urbanisation of African countries puts increasingly scarce water resources under great pressure from both industrial and domestic use, fast overwhelming ageing water management techniques and infrastructure. Kenya, like many developing economies, faces chronic water shortage as a result of which there is an increase of water-borne diseases and poisoning among urban dwellers who have been pushed to depend on alternative water sources that are unhealthy.

A heavily-polluted Ngong River courses through Nairobis Eastlands region from its industrial zone on October 1, 2008. The urbanisation of African countries puts increasingly scarce water resources under great pressure from both industrial and domestic use, fast overwhelming ageing water management techniques and infrastructure. Kenya, like many developing economies, faces chronic water shortage as a result of which there is an increase of water-borne diseases and poisoning among urban dwellers who have been pushed to depend on alternative water sources that are unhealthy.

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    A blog created to cover environmental and political information in Kenya with a view to promoting POVERTY ALLEVIATION through creating awareness of the Millennium Development Goals

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